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Towards a credible theory of mind for nursing

  • Edward Lepper
Chapter

Abstract

Edward Lepper’s chapter tries to shed some light on the problem of what a theory of mind for nursing should look like. He claims that any such theory must be credible from the following four perspectives: the nursing perspective, the scientific perspective, the perspective of ‘common sense’ and the philosophical perspective.

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© Edward Lepper 1998

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  • Edward Lepper

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