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DBMS Interface – SQL

  • Paul Beynon-Davies
Chapter
Part of the Computer Science Series book series (COMPSS)

Abstract

In this chapter we shall reflect the relational data model (chapter 3) against the contemporary practice of relational database systems. Contemporary practice is primarily centred around a language known as SQL (Structured Query Language). SQL was originally designed as a query language based on the relational calculus (section 3.3.11). The current specification of SQL is however much more than simply a query language. It is more accurately described as being a database sublanguage. Indeed, this database sub-language is becoming the standard interface to relational and non-relational DBMS.

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6.9 References

  1. Codd E. F. (1988a) ‘Fatal Flaws in SQL.’ Datamation. Aug 1988. pp. 45–48.Google Scholar
  2. Codd E. F. (1988b) ‘Fatal Flaws in SQL.'Part 2. Datamation. Sept 1988. pp. 71–74.Google Scholar
  3. Date C. J. (1987) ‘Where SQL Falls Short.’ Datamation. May 1987. pp. 83–86.Google Scholar
  4. International Standards Organisation. Database Language SQL. ISO/IEC 9075:1987.Google Scholar
  5. International Standards Organisation. Database Language SQL with Integrity Enhancement. ISO/IEC 9075:1989.Google Scholar
  6. International Standards Organisation. Database Language SQL. ISO/IEC 9075:1992.Google Scholar
  7. Melton J. and Simon A. R. (1993). Understanding the New SQL: a complete guide. Morgan Kaufmann, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© P. Beynon-Davies 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Beynon-Davies
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer StudiesUniversity of GlamorganUK

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