Summary

For many centuries Force Commanders needed only simple means for acquiring information on opposing forces before ordering the dispositions and tactics of their own forces — but major changes in the power and speed of enemy forces during this century have demanded the development of more powerful sensors, particularly radar, and improved communications. This led to the acquisition of enormous quantities of data — initially presenting problems of rapid assimilation. Large-scale enemy attacks at speed soon led, in the Naval case, to the need for greatly improved methods of sorting this data before allocating targets to weapon systems.

Keywords

Corn Shipping Radar Assure Assimilation 

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References

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    J. F. Coales and J. D. S. Rawlinson, ‘The Development of Naval Radar, 1945’, in R. Burns (ed.)’ Radar Development to 1945’, IEE Radar, Sonar, Navigation and Avionics Series 2 (Peter Peregrinus Ltd, 1988).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Naval Radar Trust 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. W. Pout

There are no affiliations available

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