Conclusion

  • Nancy North
  • Yvonne Bradshaw
Chapter

Abstract

A range of themes have been introduced and concerns discussed in the preceding chapters, together with differing theoretical explanations of both continuity and change in health care policy. It is worth noting that the issues that have given cause for concern, such as increasing demand for health care, increasing costs of provision and the concomitant search for efficiency savings and cost containment, are not peculiar to health care provision in the UK, but also reflect contemporary concerns with the provision of health care in many other advanced countries. These include the USA, Sweden, the Netherlands, France and Germany, examples from which will be used to illustrate developments later in this chapter.

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© Nancy North and Yvonne Bradshaw 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy North
  • Yvonne Bradshaw

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