Haemoglobinopathies and pregnancy

  • Rachel Celia
Chapter

Abstract

Haemoglobinopathies (HbOs), including sickle cell disease and thalassaemia, are inherited abnormalities of haemoglobin manufacture. They can occur in people of all races and origins, although they are more common in people who have non-northern European ancestry. All women at risk of having inherited an HbO should be offered antenatal testing, and appropriate laboratory and counselling services must be provided to enable them to make informed choices.

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Adams S 1994 Sickle cell disease: a case to answer? British Journal of Midwifery 2(10):475–8Google Scholar
  2. Anionwu EN 1983 Screening and counselling in the antenatal and neonatal period, Parts 1 and 2. Midwife, Health Visitor and Community Nurse 19:402–6, 440–3PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Anionwu EN 1991 A mutli-ethnic approach. Nursing 4(41):12–45Google Scholar
  4. Brown M 1994 Mothers with sickle cell disease. Health Professional Digest 3:5–6Google Scholar
  5. Eboh W, van den Akker O 1995 Service provision for sickle cell disease. British Journal of Midwifery 3(4):189–90Google Scholar
  6. Modell B 1990 The ethics of prenatal diagnosis and genetic counselling. World Health Forum 11:179–87PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Williams J 1990 The Second Leicestershire Conference on Sickle Cell Anaemia and Thalassaemia. MIDIRS Information Pack no. 15, December 1990. Bristol: MIDIRSGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Rachel Celia 1997

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  • Rachel Celia

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