The Identification of Dressing Strategies for Optimal Grinding Wheel Performance

  • W. B. Rowe
  • Xun Chen
  • M. N. Morgan
Chapter

Summary

The behaviour of the grinding wheel during the grinding process is strongly dependent on the topography of the grinding wheel surface. The surface topography of the grinding wheel is generated by the dressing process and subsequently modified by the grinding process. Grinding experiments reveal that the effect of the dressing condition on grinding behaviour is very strong during the initial grinding stage. The effect continues to some extent in the grinding wheel steady-state-wear stage, and affects the working life of the grinding wheel between dressing operations. It is found that the best time to evaluate the dressing operation is in the initial grinding stage. The research shows that the variation of grinding power can be used to interpret the effectiveness of the dressing operation. The best condition of the grinding wheel is achieved when the variation in grinding power after dressing is a minimum. This conclusion forms the basis for a strategy to optimize dressing conditions.

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Copyright information

© Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. B. Rowe
    • 1
  • Xun Chen
    • 2
  • M. N. Morgan
    • 1
  1. 1.Liverpool John Moores UniversityUK
  2. 2.Fuzhou UniversityChina

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