Complementary medicine today

  • Joanna Trevelyan
  • Brian Booth
Chapter

Abstract

Complementary, alternative, traditional, natural, fringe, unorthodox, quack: the therapies and techniques we discuss in this book have been called many things. Which you select reveals a great deal about your views on the subject.

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Copyright information

© Joanna Trevelyan and Brian Booth 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanna Trevelyan
  • Brian Booth

There are no affiliations available

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