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Foucault pp 91-112 | Cite as

The Limits Forgotten

  • Clare O’Farrell

Abstract

After Les Mots et les choses, the outer limits begin to disappear from Foucault’s work, and after about 1970, the notions of ‘power’ and ‘politics’ come to occupy an important place in his work. A tremendous amount has been written about this phase of Foucault’s work and it has now become quite a familiar ground. For this reason it is not essential to concentrate too closely on the detail of Foucault’s theories here. In addition, this work will be approached from quite a different angle from that which is usually taken, in keeping with our theme of the ‘history of the limits’.

Keywords

Penal System Disciplinary Power Disciplinary Procedure Familiar Ground Molotov Cocktail 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 6.
    Foucault, ‘Theatrum philosophicum’, 1970, pp.899, 908.Google Scholar
  2. 8.
    Foucault, ‘Entretien’, 1975, p.3; cf. OD:73 where Foucault remarks that Georges Dumézil encouraged him to write ‘at an age when I still believed that writing was a pleasure’.Google Scholar
  3. 9.
    Foucault, ‘Entretien avec Raymond Bellour’, 1971, p.201; see also ‘Entretien avec Madeleine Chapsal’, 1966, p.15.Google Scholar
  4. 13.
    Foucault, ‘Nietzsche, Freud, Marx’, 1967, p.189. This is, of course, a restatement of the views 14. on the modern ‘being of language’ that were expressed in Les Mots et les choses.Google Scholar
  5. 14.
    Descombes 1979, pp.138–9. See Foucault, ‘Interview with Lucette Finas’, in Morris and Patton, 1979, p.74. ‘As for the problem of fiction, to me this is a very important problem; I am fully aware that I have never written anything other than fictions. For all that, I would not want to say that they are outside truth. It seems possible to me to make fiction work within truth, to induce truth-effects within a fictional discourse, and in some way to make the discourse of truth arouse, “fabricate” something which does not as yet exist, thus “fiction” something.’Google Scholar
  6. 16.
    Foucault, ‘Vérité et pouvoir’, 1977, p.18; ‘Truth and Power’, in Morris and Patton, 1979, p.32. See also ‘Sorcellerie et folie’, 1976, p.18. Here Foucault declares that ‘madness is no less an effect of power than is non-madness’.Google Scholar
  7. 23.
    OD:60; cf. Foucault, ‘Theatrum philosophicum’, 1970, p.895.Google Scholar
  8. 25.
    Foucault, ‘Des supplices aux cellules’, 1975, p.16.Google Scholar
  9. 26.
    Foucault, ‘Le Piège de Vincennes’, 1970, p.35.Google Scholar
  10. 27.
    Foucault, ‘Entretien avec Madeleine Chapsal’, 1966, p.15.Google Scholar
  11. 29.
    Foucault, ‘Revolutionary Action “Until Now”’, in Bouchard 1977, p.228. This interview was originally published in French in 1971.Google Scholar
  12. 30.
    Foucault, ‘Michel Foucault on Attica’, 1974, p.157. Much later, Foucault declared it was the duty of prisoners to try to escape, since the prison could turn them into ‘dangerous’ characters. ‘Attention: danger’, 1978, p.9.Google Scholar
  13. 31.
    Foucault and Chomsky, ‘Human Nature’, 1974, p.171.Google Scholar
  14. 32.
    Foucault, ‘On Popular Justice’ in PK:26, originally published in French 1972; cf ‘Table ronde’, 1972, p.698.Google Scholar
  15. 34.
    Foucault and Chomsky, ‘Human Nature’, 1974, p.170; Foucault et le GIS (Groupe Information Santé), ‘Médecine et lutte de classes’, 1972, pp.67–73.Google Scholar
  16. 47.
    Foucault and Deleuze, ‘Les Intellectuels et le pouvoir’, 1972, p.7.Google Scholar
  17. 52.
    Cf. Foucault, ‘Questions à Michel Foucault sur la géographie’, 1976, p.81.Google Scholar
  18. 54.
    Foucault, ‘Powers and Strategies’, in Morris and Patton 1979, p.55.Google Scholar
  19. 55.
    Foucault, ‘Entretien sur la prison’ 1975, p.28; cf. ‘Power and Norm’, in Morris and Patton, 1979, p.60.Google Scholar
  20. 57.
    Foucault, ‘L’Oeil du pouvoir’, 1977, p.19.Google Scholar
  21. 59.
    VS.:93; cf. Foucault, ‘Non au sexe roi’, 1977, p.93.Google Scholar
  22. 60.
    VS:94; cf. Foucault, ‘L’occident et la vérité du sexe’, 1976, p.24.Google Scholar
  23. 61.
    Foucault, ‘Truth and Power’, in Morris and Patton 1979, p.41.Google Scholar
  24. 62.
    Foucault, ‘Preface to L’Affaire Mirval’, 1976, p.x; cf. ‘Questions à Michel Foucault sur la géographie’, 1976, pp.72, 74.Google Scholar
  25. 63.
    Foucault, ‘Non au sexe roi’, 1977, p.105.Google Scholar
  26. 64.
    Foucault, ‘Débat avec Michel Foucault’, 1980, p.47, Foucault redefines his ‘problem’ or his ‘project’ at least three or four times in this same interview. See also pp.51, 55.Google Scholar
  27. 69.
    Foucault, ‘Power and Strategies’, in Morris and Patton, 1979, p.52.Google Scholar
  28. 79.
    Foucault, ‘Vérité et pouvoir’, 1977, p.22; ‘Truth and Power’, in Morris and Patton, 1979, p.46; Foucault and Deleuze, ‘Les Intellectuels et le pouvoir’, 1972, p.4.Google Scholar
  29. 80.
    Foucault and Deleuze, ‘Les Intellectuels et le pouvoir’, 1972, p.4. See also ‘The political function of the intellectual’, 1977, p.12. This article originally appeared in French in 1976.Google Scholar
  30. 81.
    Foucault, ‘Vérité et pouvoir’, 1977, pp.25–6; ‘Truth and Power’, in Morris and Patton 1979, pp.46–7. ‘The essential political problem for the intellectual, is not criticising the possible ideological contents of science or making sure that his scientific practice is accompanied by the correct ideology, but knowing that it is possible to establish a new politics of truth. The problem is not one of changing people’s “consciousness” or what is in their heads, but changing the political, economic and institutional order of the production of truth.’Google Scholar
  31. 82.
    Foucault, ‘Vérité et pouvoir’, 1977, p.24; ‘Truth and Power’, in Morris and Patton 1979, p.43.Google Scholar
  32. 83.
    Foucault, ‘Foucault répond à Sartre’ 1968, pp.20–21.Google Scholar
  33. 84.
    Foucault and Deleuze, ‘Les Intellectuels et le pouvoir’, 1972, p.4.Google Scholar
  34. 85.
    Foucault, ‘Power and Strategies’, in Morris and Patton 1979, p.57; cf. ‘Body/Power’, in PK:62: ‘What the intellectual can do is provide instruments of analysis, and at present, this is the historian’s essential role.’Google Scholar
  35. 86.
    Foucault, ‘Des supplices aux cellules’, 1975, p.16. Cf. also ‘Sur la sellette’, 1975, p.3. In this interview he portrays himself rather dramatically as a ‘seller of instruments, a provider of recipes, a register of symptoms, a cartographer, a surveyor of plans, a manufacturer of arms.’ See also ‘Questions à Michel Foucault sur la géographie’, 1976, p.73 and ‘Débat avec Michel Foucault’, 1980, p.41.Google Scholar
  36. 91.
    Gordon, ‘Preface’, 1981, pp.vii–viii; cf. ‘Afterword’, 1981, pp.233, 246, 255; Davis 1975, p.238;Google Scholar
  37. Racevskis, The Freedom of Philosophy 1985, p.126.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Clare O’Farrell 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clare O’Farrell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Education StudiesBrisbane College of Advanced EducationAustralia

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