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Radar at Sea pp 128-161 | Cite as

1942: Malta Convoys and the Invasion of North Africa

  • Derek Howse

Abstract

On 11 February 1942, the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, accompanied by the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen and a destroyer screen, sailed from Brest after dark, turning up-Channel unobserved by any British forces. Such a move had been expected in Britain and the most detailed preparations had been made to meet this eventuality — or its alternative, breaking out into the Atlantic — to be put into force by the codeword ‘Fuller’.

Keywords

Merchant Ship Western Approach Small Ship Main Armament Radar Display 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Naval Radar Trust 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek Howse
    • 1
  1. 1.Sevenoaks, KentUK

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