The facilitative environment

  • Mary Carroll
  • L. Jane Brue
  • Brian Booth
Chapter

Abstract

It is well known that the physical environment influences well-being, learning and functioning. Environment is always a prime concern in schools; desks, chairs, lighting, toilets and other equipment are chosen with a mind to the physical and developmental characteristics of the children who will use them in mind: a young child is not given a chair or desk that was designed for a secondary school pupil. Supplies, such as thick crayons and large print books, are selected to facilitate the learning and development of the children. Similarly, offices are designed with the needs of working adults in mind, so that they can perform at their best; and it should be the same with the continuing care environment, for it is critical to facilitate physical functioning and to achieve the psychosocial well-being of the people for whom these surroundings will be ‘home’.

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Chapter 15

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Carroll
  • L. Jane Brue
  • Brian Booth

There are no affiliations available

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