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Cyprus pp 150-168 | Cite as

Approaches to the Study of Comparative Federalism: the Dynamics of Federalism

  • Alain-G. Gagnon

Abstract

Since the early 1960s, a number of multi-community states have experienced serious political difficulties. Cases in point in the Middle East include Israel, Lebanon, and Cyprus. The fact that the Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security has been sponsoring a series of workshops on Cyprus is evidence that mechanisms for conflict management, if not resolution, need to be found.

Keywords

Conflict Resolution Provincial Government Conflict Management Political Behaviour Federal System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alain-G. Gagnon

There are no affiliations available

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