The Strange Politics of Lviv: An Essay in Search of an Explanation

  • Roman Szporluk

Abstract

The March 1990 election to the Ukrainian republic’s Supreme Soviet, as Chapter 8 in this volume has indicated, produced striking and quite unexpected results. First, the opposition made a very respectable showing in the republic as a whole — even though its main force, Rukh, had been organised formally barely half a year before — and even though opposition candidates were denied registration in many Eastern and Southern regions. Second, Rukh and its allies won in a landslide in the Western areas, in the regions of Lviv, Ivano-Frankivs’k and Ternopil, once known as Austria’s Eastern Galicia. The following are rough figures on the affiliation of deputies elected in 1990. (The opposition is grouped in the Narodna Rada, an umbrella organisation.)

Keywords

Assimilation Ruthenia Romania Kazakhstan Sira 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    The figures mentioned in the text discussion are cited from Oleksandr Laver and Yurii Azhniuk, ‘Sira tin’ asymiliatsii’, Molod’ Ukrainy (6 March 1991) p. 2, and they differ somewhat from those used in the statistical Table 9.0, for which another source was the base. The article by these two authors is highly emotional in tone even though it is full of various statistical tables; it is a very revealing and dramatic survey of demographic trends in the Ukrainian republic as a whole, and of demographic history of Ukrainians in the USSR between 1959 and 1989. The authors cite certain data from sources that to this writer’s knowledge have not been published. They do not consider the ethnic situation in a regional breakdown within the Ukraine.Google Scholar

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© International Council for Soviet and East European Studies, and Zvi Gitelman 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman Szporluk

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