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The Use of Thermography for Tool Wear Monitoring

  • K. F. Hale
  • B. E. Jones
Chapter

Summary

Developments in the field of thermal imaging have been rapid in the past few years. The current availability of commercial systems has enabled the application of thermal imaging techniques to be carried into a wide range of areas where non-contact temperature measurement is required. Sophisticated imaging cameras and their accompanying computers are very expensive and their use can only be justified to avoid the risk of high cost failures. However, inexpensive basic thermal infrared sensors are now coming on the market so that applications to lower cost failure prevention can be considered. Such an application is monitoring tool wear during production drilling operations by measuring the temperature of the drill swarf or chips that are ejected from the drill during drilling. As the tool wears, the temperature of the drill chips will increase as a greater amount of the kinetic energy of the drill is converted into heat. Experiments have shown that non-contacting thermal measurements can successfully monitor tool wear.

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References

  1. S.G. BURNAY, T.I. WILLIAMS and C.H.N. JONES, Applications of Thermal Imaging IOP Publishing Ltd, Adam Hilger, Bristol, 1988.Google Scholar
  2. K.F. HALE and B.E. JONES, Tool wear monitoring sensors. Proc. of 2nd Int. Conf. COMADEM 90, Brunel University, Chapman and Hall, London, pp 343–348, 1990.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. F. Hale
    • 1
  • B. E. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.The Brunel Centre for Manufacturing MetrologyBrunel UniversityUK

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