Observation

  • Lee Harvey
  • Morag MacDonald
Chapter

Abstract

Observation is a major means by which people develop their knowledge of the world they live in. Similarly, sociologists make widespread use of observation in developing their understanding of the social world. Observation studies are undertaken in nearly all areas of sociological enquiry but have been developed in particular in the sociologies of organisation, work, leisure, deviance, and education.

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Further Reading

  1. Observation techniques: Burgess, 1984; Friedrichs, 1975; McCall and Simmons, 1969; Rose, 1982; Spradley, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. Ethnography: Burgess, 1982; Denzin, 1970; Filstead, 1970; Hammersley and Atkinson, 1983.Google Scholar
  3. Symbolic interactionism: Blumer, 1969; Charon, 1979; Couch et al., 1986; Manis and Meltzer, 1978; Meltzer et a1., 1975; Rock, 1979; Williams, 1986.Google Scholar
  4. Ethnomethodology: Benson and Hughes, 1983; Cicourel, 1964, 1976; Coulter, 1988; Douglas, 1970, 1971; Garfinkel, 1967; Heritage, 1984; Mehan and Wood, 1975; Rogers, 1983; Sharrock and Anderson, 1986; Turner, 1974.Google Scholar
  5. Deviance: Aggleton, 1987; Becker, 1963; Box, 1983; Brake and Hale, 1992; Campbell, 1981, 1984; Chambliss, 1978; Cohen, 1971, 1973; Downes and Rock, 1988; Fitzgerald, 1985; Hall et al., 1978; Heidensohn, 1985; Lea and Young, 1984; Luhrman, 1989; Matza, 1964; Parker, 1974; Patrick, 1973; Pfohl, 1986; Polsky, 1971; Smart, 1977; Suchar, 1978; Taylor, 1983; Taylor et al., 1973, 1975; Williams et al., 1984.Google Scholar
  6. Work: Beynon, 1973; Cavendish, 1982; Gabriel, 1988; Hacker, 1989; Harastzi, 1977; Marshall, 1986; Watson, 1987; Westwood, 1984; Wood, 1991.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Lee Harvey and Morag MacDonald 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Harvey
  • Morag MacDonald

There are no affiliations available

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