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Yugoslav Investments in the Third World

  • Patrick Artisien
  • Carl H. McMillan
  • Matija Rojec

Abstract

The senior executive of a large Yugoslav multinational with investments in LDCs explained his firm’s industrial strategy in the following terms: ‘We aim to strengthen our cooperation primarily because of our long-term economic and commercial interests. The future development of our company depends upon this type of industrial cooperation. This would be our attitude towards cooperation with LDCs, regardless of the Yugoslav government’s official policy. I am convinced that we cannot discuss the future prospects of Yugoslav industry without referring to our cooperation with LDCs.’1

Keywords

Host Country Joint Venturis Legal Limit Local Partner Ownership Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Iso Papo, ‘Neka iskustva Energoinvesta u pogledu razvijenijih oblika privredne saradnje sa zemljama u razvoju’, (Ljubljana: Centre for International Cooperation and Development, 1982).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. T. Wells, Third World Multinationals, (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1983);Google Scholar
  3. 2a.
    D. J. Lecraw, ‘Direct Investment by Firms from Less Developed Countries’, Oxford Economic Papers (November 1977); andGoogle Scholar
  4. 2b.
    S. Lall, The New Multinationals (Chichester: Wiley, 1983).Google Scholar
  5. 3.
    J. Y. Dunning, ‘The Determinants of International Production’, Oxford Economic Papers, vol. 25, no. 3 (1973).Google Scholar
  6. 4.
    J. Riedel, ‘Attitudes in the Federal Republic of Germany to the Policies of Developing Countries regarding Foreign Investors’, Industry and Development, no. 13 (New York, 1984).Google Scholar
  7. 5.
    See G. D. Newbould, P. J. Buckley and J. Thurwell, Going International: The Experience of Smaller Companies Overseas (London: Associated Business Press, 1978).Google Scholar
  8. 6.
    D. J. Lecraw, ‘Direct Investment by Firms from Less Developed Countries’, Oxford Economic Papers (November 1977).Google Scholar
  9. 7.
    L. T. Wells, Third World Multinationals (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1983).Google Scholar
  10. 8.
    S. Lall, The New Multinationals (Chichester: Wiley, 1983).Google Scholar
  11. 9.
    L. T. Wells, ‘Foreign Investors from the Third World’, in K. Kumar and M. McLeod (eds), Multinationals from Developing Countries (Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, 1981).Google Scholar
  12. 10.
    D. J. Lecraw, op. cit.Google Scholar
  13. 11.
    See P. Artisien, Joint Ventures in Yugoslav Industry, (Aldershot: Gower, 1985); andGoogle Scholar
  14. 11a.
    P. Artisien and P. J. Buckley, ‘Joint Ventures in Yugoslavia: Opportunities and Constraints’, Journal of International Business Studies, vol. 16, no. 1 (Spring 1985).Google Scholar
  15. 12.
    P. Beamish, Multinational Joint Ventures in Developing Countries, (London: Routledge, 1988).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Patrick Artisien, Carl H. McMillan and Matija Rojec 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Artisien
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Carl H. McMillan
    • 4
  • Matija Rojec
    • 5
  1. 1.University of CardiffUK
  2. 2.European Institute of Public AdministrationMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Centre for International Cooperation and DevelopmentLjubljanaYugoslavia
  4. 4.Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  5. 5.Centre for International Cooperation and DevelopmentLjubljanaYugoslavia

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