The Marginalisation of South East Asian Refugees

  • Gertrud Neuwirth

Abstract

Canada became actively involved in the resettlement of South East Asian refugees in July 1979.1 In response to public pressure and following the inter-governmental summit in Tokyo, the government agreed at that time to admit up to 50000 refugees, but made the resettlement dependent on the private sector sponsoring half this number.2 The so-called matching formula between privately sponsored and government assisted refugees served as a political barometer in terms of which the willingness of Canadians to resettle refugees could be measured. If the private sector would not have been able to sponsor its allotted share, the government could then have reduced its own quota accordingly. However, Canadians not only met the government’s challenge, but within a few months they also agreed to sponsor more than their share of 25 000 refugees. This unexpected response, in turn, prompted the government to increase its own intake by an additional 5000. Thus at the end of 1980 the government had admitted more than 60000 refugees and, in addition, was able to defray over half of the settlement expenses to the private sector (see Chapter 14).3

Keywords

Migration Europe Transportation Income Assure 

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References

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Copyright information

© Refugee Studies Programme 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gertrud Neuwirth

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