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China and Taiwan

  • N. Mark Collins
  • Jeffrey A. Sayer
  • Timothy C. Whitmore

Abstract

A nationwide conference on forestry in China in 1979 warned that by the end of the century there will be no trees to harvest. Deforestation is contributing to desertification, erosion and air pollution. It is thought to have caused marked increases also in the frequency and extent of droughts and flooding.

Keywords

Rain Forest Mangrove Forest Sika Deer Moist Forest Sacred Grove 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© IUCN 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Mark Collins
    • 1
  • Jeffrey A. Sayer
    • 2
  • Timothy C. Whitmore
    • 3
  1. 1.World Conservation Monitoring CentreCambridgeUK
  2. 2.International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, GlandSwitzerland
  3. 3.Geography DepartmentCambridge UniversityUK

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