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Fieldwork Among the Sarakatsani, 1954–55

  • John Campbell
Chapter
Part of the St Antony’s / Macmillan Series book series

Abstract

The Sarakatsani are Greek transhumant pastoralists who graze flocks of sheep and goats in the mountains of continental Greece in the summer, and in the coastal plains in winter. In 1954–55 my fieldwork among the Sarakatsani of Zagori, a district north-east of Jannina in the Pindus mountains, was the earliest research carried out by a British social anthropologist in Greece. It has been suggested to me that an account of the background to this enterprise might be of some interest.1 I do not know whether this is so, but I have been persuaded to make the attempt.

Keywords

Married Woman Sibling Group Central Hearth Descent Group Early Fifty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 2.
    J. K. Campbell,Honour, Family and Patronage, Oxford, 1964.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    A. R. Radcliffe-Brown, Structure and Function in Primitive Society, London, 1952.Google Scholar
  3. B. Malinowski, Magic, Science and Religion and other essays, Glencoe, 1948.Google Scholar
  4. S. F. Nadel, The Foundations of Social Anthropology, London, 1951.Google Scholar
  5. M. Fortes and E. E. Evans-Pritchard (eds), African Political Systems, London, 1940.Google Scholar
  6. A. R. Radcliffe-Brown and D. Forde (eds), African Systems of Kinship and Marriage, London, 1950.Google Scholar
  7. 4.
    R. Needham, Structure and Sentiment, Chicago, 1962.Google Scholar
  8. M. Douglas, Purity and Danger, London, 1966.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 5.
    E. E. Evans-Pritchard, The Sanusi of Cyrenaica, Oxford, 1949.Google Scholar
  10. 6.
    E. E. Evans-Pritchard, Social Anthropology, London, 1951, p. 80.Google Scholar
  11. 7.
    That I did rapidly improve my understanding of the Sarakatsan dialect was largerly due to Carsten Höeg’s excellent linguistic study: Les Saracatsans, Étude Linguistique, 2 vols, Paris and Copenhagen, 1925 and 1926.Google Scholar
  12. 8.
    E. E. Evans-Pritchard, The Nuer, Oxford, 1940.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Campbell

There are no affiliations available

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