Empirics

  • Jonathan Liebenau
  • James Backhouse
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Information Systems Series book series (INSYS)

Abstract

Communications engineers will aim to produce channels which assure clear and unambiguous signals, and to exploit the capacity of every channel fully. When a signal is sent out, there must be a code by which it may be interpreted. Various properties of different types of transmission channels have been identified in communications engineering such as noise, distortion, and redundancy. These properties can be measured and permit the engineer to compare and to evaluate the different channels available. Empirics concerns this transmission of signals, and their coding and decoding by interpreters. In this chapter we will explain the role of the physical and engineering aspects of information within the structure of semiotics.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Cherry, Colin, On Human Communication, Cambridge: MIT Press, 1978. An authoritative survey of the field of communications bringing together diverse subjects such as logic, language, philosophy and engineering. The theoretical base is from Shannon and Weaver.Google Scholar
  2. Dretske, F., Knowledge and the Flow of Information, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1981. Dretske introduces a theory of information derived from the statistical theories of Shannon, but develops to interest those concerned with the relationship between sensory and cognitive processes.Google Scholar
  3. Shannon, C. and Weaver, W., The Mathematical Theory of Communication, Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1949. This is the classic seminal work on the theory of information approached from the disciplines of mathematics and statistics. It provides an understanding of the tools needed for work at the empirics level.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© J. Liebenau and J. Backhouse 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Liebenau
    • 1
  • James Backhouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information SystemsLondon School of EconomicsUK

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