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Neural Population Encoding of Touch Intensity

  • O. Franzén
  • D. KenshaloSr
  • G. Essick
Chapter
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series

Abstract

The simplest mechanical stimulus of supraliminal amplitude delivered to the finger tip activates a large number of afferents which may in turn evoke complex multidimensional sensations. These sensations can, to a first approximation, be understood by the response characteristics of the population of mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the hand (Johansson, 1978; Johansson, 1979). In order to study the peripheral neural basis of the sense of touch, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between the activity of both individual neurons and populations of neurons and the psychophysical responses elicited by the same or similar stimuli.

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© Macmillan Publishers Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Franzén
  • D. KenshaloSr
  • G. Essick

There are no affiliations available

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