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Government Policy, Food Security and Nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Africa’s food insecurity and malnutrition problems, which appear to affect 25 per cent of the population, are a result of inappropriate development strategies and government policies, adverse and deteriorating terms of trade in international product and capital markets, and a skewed asset distribution.

Keywords

Food Security Food Insecure Food Price Household Food Household Food Security 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Pinstrup-Andersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Cornell Nutritional Surveillance ProgramIthacaUSA

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