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Protectionism, Internal Market Completion, and Foreign Trade Policy in the European Community

  • Carlo Secchi

Abstract

In quantitative terms the European Community (EC) is the most important actor in world trade. The fundamental principle on which the EC is based, as indicated in the Preface to the Treaty of Rome, is freedom of trade. This does not mean that the 12 countries in the community are models of liberalism in their domestic and foreign relations. In fact, despite the abolition of tariff barriers, the community market is still subject to many non-tariff barriers (NTBs) and regulations that affect internal trade, while trade policy toward third countries contains a significant amount of protection, not to mention the effects of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and other sectoral policies.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product European Community Trade Policy Common Agricultural Policy External Trade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Enzo Grilli and Enrico Sassoon 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Secchi

There are no affiliations available

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