Risk from Heredity, Race and Family

  • Bernadette Herity
Chapter

Abstract

Only about 1% of liveborn children have an inherited disorder which is manifest at birth or develops later, and if one also includes those conditions where there are substantial genetic influences, the figure rises to 2–5%. As an inherited disease, cancer is rare and accounts for only a small proportion of total cancer incidence and mortality. Although clustering of cancer in families is well known, debate centres on whether such cancers are hereditary or whether they represent a shared exposure to similar environmental influences within a family.

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Further Reading

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    Anderson, D.E. (1975) Familial susceptibility. In Persons at High Risk of Cancer: an Approach to Cancer Etiology and Control (Ed. J.F. Fraumeni Jr). Academic Press, New York, pp. 39–54Google Scholar
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    Anderson, D.E. (1982) Familial predisposition. In Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention (Ed. D. Schottenfeld and J.F. Fraumeni Jr). WB Saunders Co., Philadelphia, pp. 483–493Google Scholar
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    Bodmer, W.F. (1984) Cancer genetics. In Inheritance of Susceptibility to Cancer in Man (Ed. W.F. Bodmer). Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 1–15Google Scholar
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    Petrakis N.L., Ernster, V.L. and King, M.C. (1982) Breast. In Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention (Ed. D. Schottenfeld and J.F. Fraumeni Jr). WB Saunders & Co., Philadelphia, pp. 855–870Google Scholar
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    Ponder, B.A.J. (1984) Role of genetic and familial factors. In Risk Factors and Multiple Cancer (Ed. B.A. Stoll). New Horizons in Oncology, Vol 3. John Wiley, London, pp. 177–204Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Schimke, R.N. (1983) Cancer genetics. In Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics (Ed. A.E.H. Emery and D.L. Rimoin). Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, pp. 1401–1426Google Scholar
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    Swift, M. (1982) Single gene syndromes. In Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention (Ed. D. Schottenfeld and J.F. Fraumeni Jr). WB Saunders & Co., Philadelphia, pp. 475–482Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Weatherall, D.J. (1985) The New Genetics and Clinical Practice. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 8–27, 123-145Google Scholar
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    White, R. (1984) DNA polymorphism: new approaches to the genetics of cancer. In Inheritance of Susceptibility to Cancer in Man (Ed. W.F. Bodmer). Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 175–186Google Scholar
  10. Note: These sources have been extensively consulted in the compilation of this review.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Editor and the Contributors 1989

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  • Bernadette Herity

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