Incentive Policies and Agricultural Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Bela Balassa

Abstract

This essay examines the experience of sub-Saharan Africa with economic incentives in general, and agricultural incentives in particular, and analyzes the effects of these incentives on economic performance. Section I of the essay reports on the findings of an econometric investigation on the responsiveness of exports to incentives. Section II reviews changes in the export market shares of sub-Saharan African countries pursuing different development strategies. Section III examines changes in export market shares for four sub-Saharan African countries, Tanzania, Kenya, Ghana, and the Ivory Coast. Sections IV and V provide a comparative analysis of agricultural policies and performance for two pairs of these countries: Tanzania and Kenya (Section IV) and Ghana and the Ivory Coast (Section V).

Keywords

Sugar Starch Maize Transportation Income 

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Notes

  1. 3.
    B. Balassa, ‘Adjustment Policies and Development Strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1973–78,’ M. Syrquin, L. Taylor, and L. E. Westphal (eds), Economic Strategy and Performance, Essays in Honor of Hollis B. Chenery (New York: Academic Press, 1984) pp. 317–40.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    R. Gulhati, B. Swadesh, and V. Atukorala, ‘Exchange Rate Policies in Eastern and Southern Africa, 1965–1983,’ World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 720 (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985).Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    K. M. Cleaver, ‘The Impact of Price and Exchange Rate Policies in Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa,’ World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 728 (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985).Google Scholar
  4. 10.
    F. Ellis, ‘Agricultural Price Policy in Tanzania,’ World Development, XIII (1985) pp. 525–38.Google Scholar
  5. 11.
    Unless otherwise noted, the data originate in K. Meyers, ‘Agricultural Policy and Performance in Tanzania’ (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1986) mimeo and ‘Agricultural Policy and Performance in Kenya’ (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985) mimeo.Google Scholar
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    U. Lele, C. Else, and H. McKonnen, ‘How Different are Agricultural Pricing and Marketing Policies of Socialist and Market Oriented African Countries?’ (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985) mimeo.Google Scholar
  7. 14.
    C. L. Jabara, ‘Agricultural Pricing Policy in Kenya,’ World Development, XIII (1985) pp. 611–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 18.
    Unless otherwise noted, the data originate in L. Sherbourne, ‘Agricultural Policy and Performance in Ghana’ (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985) mimeo and ‘Agricultural Policy and Performance in the Ivory Coast’ (Washington, DC: World Bank, 1985) mimeo.Google Scholar
  9. 19.
    J. D. Stryker and L. E. Brandt, ‘Price Policy in Africa’ (Washington, DC: Associates for International Resources and Development, 1985).Google Scholar
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    R. Summers and A. Heston, ‘Improved International Comparisons of Real Product and Its Composition, 1950–80,’ Review of Income and Wealth, XXX (1984) pp. 207–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Bela Balassa 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bela Balassa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins UniversityUSA
  2. 2.The World BankUSA

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