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What Can Agriculture Do for the Poorest Rural Groups?

  • Hans P. Binswanger
  • Jaime B. Quizon
Chapter
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Most of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas. They derive a large share of income from agriculture, as small farmers or as workers – or as both. Agricultural development is therefore often seen as the key to reducing poverty, especially rural poverty. In most of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, where the rural poor are mostly small farmers, it is clear that increasing the efficiency of these farmers vis-à-vis large farmers (or of the country as a whole vis-à-vis competing countries) improves the small farmers’ condition. They can expand their sales and/or can produce their own subsistence with less effort or lower cash costs (for a full discussion see World Bank, 1986).

Keywords

Food Price Real Income Agricultural Output Urban Poor Rural Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans P. Binswanger
    • 1
  • Jaime B. Quizon
    • 2
  1. 1.World BankUSA
  2. 2.Chase Econometrics and World BankUSA

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