Great Power Military Relations

  • Michael A. Morris


There are both positive and negative aspects of military power in South America in general and the Southern Cone in particular. On the negative side, considerable military weaponry possessed by neighbouring countries often aggravates mistrust just as this mistrust in turn fuels arms expansion. In a word, arms tend to contribute to interstate tension and tension spurs arms build-ups. Ongoing disputes accentuate the international action-reaction process connecting hostile relations and weaponry growth. This circular process dragging countries into militarisation and conflict is as threatening for South America and the Southern Cone as other parts of the developing world.


Military Expenditure Military Spending Military Government Southern Cone Nuclear Weapon State 


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Copyright information

© Michael A. Morris 1990

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  • Michael A. Morris

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