Advertisement

Design of Concrete Pavements

  • R. J. Salter
Chapter

Abstract

Concrete pavements are constructed in a variety of forms by several different construction methods. They may be reinforced or unreinforced; if reinforced the steel may take the form of individual bars or welded mesh. The slabs may contain several different types of joint or they may be unjointed or continuous. Construction may be carried out by the conventional side-form process using a concreting train with many differing units, or one of several forms of slip-form paver may be employed operating with a minimum of additional equipment.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. (1).
    Department of Transport, Specification for Road and Bridge Works (HMSO, (1976)Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    BS 882: 1965 Coarse and Fine Aggregates from Natural SourcesGoogle Scholar
  3. (3).
    BS 1047: 1952 Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag Coarse Aggregate for ConcreteGoogle Scholar
  4. (4).
    BS 1881: 1970 Methods of Testing ConcreteGoogle Scholar
  5. (5).
    DoE, Design of Normal Concrete Mixes. (HMSO, 1975)Google Scholar
  6. (6).
    DoE, Road Research Laboratory Road Note 29, 3rd ed.: A Guide to the Structural Design of Pavements for New Roads (HMSO, 1970)Google Scholar
  7. (7).
    DoE, Notes for Guidance on the Specification for Road and Bridge Works (HMSO, 1976)Google Scholar
  8. (8).
    American Association of State Highway Officials, A.A.S.H.O. Interim Guide for Design of Pavement Structures (Washington, 1972)Google Scholar
  9. (9).
    J. M. Gregory, A. E. Burks and V. A. Pink, Transport and Road Research Laboratory Report 612. Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements: a Report of the Study Group. (Crowthorne, 1974)Google Scholar
  10. (10).
    American Concrete Institute, ‘A Design Procedure for Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements for Highways’, J. Am. Conc. Inst. 69 (1972) 309–19Google Scholar
  11. (11).
    C. P. Vetter, ‘Stresses in Reinforced Concrete Due to Volume Changes’, Trans. Am. Soc. Civil Enginrs. 98 (1933) 1039–80.Google Scholar
  12. (12).
    Continuously Reinforced Pavement Group, Design and Construction of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (Chicago, 1968)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© R.J. Salter 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Salter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BradfordUK

Personalised recommendations