Malta

  • Thomas T. Mackie
  • Richard Rose

Abstract

During the nineteenth century Malta was ruled by a British Governor, assisted by a Council of Government. After 1849 the Council included elected members. In 1887 the elected members were given a majority of seats. Nationalist candidates committed to the defence of Italian, the language of the island’s traditional social elite, were almost unfailingly elected. Conflict between the elected majority and the governor over the language question led to the suspension of the constitution. In 1903 a Council of Government was introduced in which elected members were in a minority. Nationalist members were regularly returned, often unopposed (Dobie, 1967: 38–79).

Keywords

Income 

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Sources

  1. Annual Abstract of Statistics (Valletta: Central Office of Statistics, 1970)Google Scholar
  2. Colonial Office, Malta, Report of Constitutional Commissioner (London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1947)Google Scholar
  3. Department of Information, The Constitution and the Electoral Commission (Valletta: 1986)Google Scholar
  4. E. Dobie, Malta’s Road to Independence (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1967)Google Scholar
  5. H. Frendo, Party Politics in a Fortress Colony (Valletta: Midsea Books, 1979)Google Scholar
  6. S. Howe, ‘The Maltese general election of 1987’, Electoral Studies, 6,3, (1987) 235–247CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Results of Poll/Rizultat Tal-Vatazzjoni-General Elections/Elezzjonijiet Generali 1976 (Valletta: Government Printer 1976) and subsequent volumes in the same seriesGoogle Scholar
  8. M.J. Schiavone, L’-Elezzjonijiet F’Malta 1849–1981 (Valletta: Pubblikazzjoni Bugelli, 1987)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Thomas T. Mackie and Richard Rose 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas T. Mackie
    • 1
  • Richard Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.University of StrathclydeUK

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