Advertisement

Applications of Microbial Electrochemistry

  • H. Peter Bennetto
  • Gerard M. Delaney
  • Jeremy R. Mason
  • Sibel D. Roller
  • John L. Stirling
  • Christopher F. Thurston

Abstract

Although electrical interactions of living cells have been known since Galvani’s time, the advantages of interfacing electrotechnology with biology have not yet been fully appreciated. The workings of the cell involve many types of charge-transfer process (e.g. biochemical ‘redox’ reactions, ion-transport and diffusion), and in some senses the micro-organism can be regarded as an electrochemical machine2 which, if interfaced with an electrochemical system, can be manipulated by ‘taking’ electrons from the biosystem or ‘pushing’ them back in. Since electrochemistry is itself becoming increasingly versatile and is ideally suited to ‘fine tuning’ by computer control, it is to be expected that such application will broaden the scope of process-control, products and devices available to biotechnology. Some likely areas for exploitation of electron transduction from micro-organisms are summarised below.

Keywords

Apply Biochemistry Microbial Fuel Cell Electrochemical Machine2 Brilliant Cresyl Blue Benzyl VIOLOGEN 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. 1.
    Aston, W. J. and Turner, A. P. F. (1984). In Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Reviews (Ed. G. Russell), Vol. 1, pp.89–120. Intercept, Newcastle-upon-TyneGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bennetto, H. P. (1984). In Life Chemistry Reports (Eds. A. M. Michelson and J. V. Bannister), Vol.2, No.4, pp.363–453. Harwood Academic, LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bennetto, H. P., Box, J., Delaney, G. M., Mason, J. R., Roller, S. D., Stirling, J. L. and Thurston, C. F. (1986). In Biosensors: Fundamentals and Applications (Eds. A. P. F. Turner, I. Karube, and G. S. Wilson) Oxford University Press (in press)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bennetto, H. P., Delaney, G. M., Mason, J. R., Roller, S. D., Stirling, J. L. and Thurston, C. F. (1986). Biotechnol. Letters, 7, 699–705. (1985). UK Patent Application No. 2165087A; US Patent Application Serial No. 755779CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bennetto, H. P., Dew, M. E., Stirling, J. L. and Tanaka, K. (1981). Chem. Ind., 776–778Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bennetto, H. P., Stirling, J. L. and Tanaka, K. (1985). Chem. Ind., 695–697Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bennetto, H. P., Stirling, J. L., Tanaka, K. and Vega, C. A. (1980). Soc. Gen. Microbiol. Quarterly, 8, 37. (1983). Biotechnol. Bioeng., 25, 559–568Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bennetto, H. P., Tanaka, K. and Matsuda, K. (1984). In Charge and Field Effects in Biosystems (Eds. M. J. Allen and P. N. R. Usherwood). Abacus Press, Tunbridge Wells, pp.515–522Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bowen, R. and Pugh, S. (1985). Chem. Ind., 323–326; Allen, P. M. and Bowen, W. R. (1985). Trends Biotechnol., 3, 145–149CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cass, A. E. G. (1984). In Life Chemistry Reports (Eds. A. M. Michelson and J. V. Bannister), Vol.2, No.4, pp.321–362. Harwood Academic, LondonGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Cass, A. E. G., Davis, G., Francis, G. D., Hill, H. A. O., Aston, W. J., Higgins, I. J., Plotkin, E. V., Scott, L. D. L. and Turner, A. P. F. (1984). Analyt. Chem., 56, 667–673CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chibata, I. and Wingard, L. B. Jr. (1983). Applied Biochemistry and Bio-engineering. Vol.4: Immobilised Cells. Academic Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Clark, D. J., Calder, M. R., Carr, R. J. G., Blake-Coleman, B. C., Moody, S. C. and Collinge, T. A. (1985). Biosensors, 1, 213–320CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Corcoran, C. A. and Rechnitz, G. A. (1985). Trends Biotechnol., 3, 92–96CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Delaney, G. M., Bennetto, H. P., Mason, J. R., Roller, S. D., Stirling, J. L. and Thurston, C. F. (1984). J. Chem. Tech. Biotechnol., 34B, 13–27Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Guilbault, G. G. (1984). Analytical Uses of Immobilised Enzymes. Marcel Dekker, New York, pp.211–326Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Higgins, I. J. and Hill, H. A. O. (1979). In Microbial Technology (Eds. A. T. Bull, D. C. Ellwood and C. Ratledge), Gen. Microb. Symp. No. 29, pp.359–377. Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Murray, R. W. (1980). Accounts Chem. Res., 13, 135–141. (1984). In Electro-analytical Chemistry (Ed. A. J. Bard). Vol.13, pp. 191–368. Marcel Dekker, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Roller, S. D., Bennetto, H. P., Delaney, G. M., Mason, J. R., Stirling, J. L. and Thurston, C. F. (1984). J. Chem. Tech. Biotechnol., 34B, 3–12Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Scheller, F. W., Schubert, F., Renneberg, R. and Miller, H. G. (1985). Biosensors, 1, 135–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Suzuki, S. and Karube, I. (1983). In Applied Biochemistry and Bioengineering (Eds. I. Chibata and L. B. Wingard), Vol.4, Academic Press, London, pp.281–310Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Thurston, C. F., Bennetto, H. P., Delaney, G. M., Mason, J. R., Roller, S. D. and Stirling, J. L. (1985). J. Gen. Microbiol., 131, 1393–1401Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Wiseman, A. (1985). Handbook of Enzyme Biotechnology (2nd edn). Ellis Horwood, ChichesterGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Editor and the Contributors 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Peter Bennetto
  • Gerard M. Delaney
  • Jeremy R. Mason
  • Sibel D. Roller
  • John L. Stirling
  • Christopher F. Thurston

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations