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Ukraine in the Second World War

  • Bohdan Krawchenko
Part of the St Antony’s/Macmillan series book series

Abstract

Ukraine had barely begun to recover from the traumas of the 1930s when it was plunged into the cauldron of the Second World War. It was the largest Soviet republic which the Germans occupied in full, and it was held longer than parts of Russia which they were able to seize.1 In the course of the conflict 6.8 million people were killed, of whom 600 000 were Jews and 1.4 million were military personnel who either perished on the front or died as prisoners of war. In addition, over two million citizens of the republic were sent to Germany as ‘slave labour’.2 By 1944, when the German armies were cleared from Soviet Ukrainian soil, the republic was literally in ruins. Over 700 cities and towns were destroyed — 42 per cent of all urban centres devastated by the war in the entire USSR — and over 28 000 villages. Direct material damage amounted to 285 milliard rubles (in 1941 prices) or over 40 per cent of the USSR’s losses. But the real costs of the war to the Ukrainian republic (damage, war effort, goods requisitioned by Germans, etc) are estimated at an astronomical one trillion two hundred milliard rubles (in 1941 prices).3

Keywords

Local Administration National Consciousness Collective Farm German Occupation Soviet Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Bohdan Krawchenko 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bohdan Krawchenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Canadian Institute of Ukrainian StudiesUniversity of AlbertaCanada

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