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Prediction of Treatment Response to Selective Antidepressants from Clonidine and Apomorphine Neuroendocrine Challenges

  • M. Ansseau
  • R. von Frenckell
  • D. Maassen
  • J.-L. Cerfontaine
  • P. Papart
  • M. Timsit-Berthier
  • J.-J. Legros
  • G. Franck
Chapter

Abstract

Classically, the biochemical pathophysiology of depression is based on central disturbances in catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission (van Praag, 1980a, b). However, antidepressants are only effective in 60 to 75% of depressive disorders and their success rates are very similar in double-blind studies (Davis, 1985). Recent ‘second-generation’ antidepressants are characterised by their selective activity on neurotransmitter systems. Compounds like zimeldine, fluoxetine, or fluvoxamine selectively inhibit serotonin reuptake, while compounds like nomifensine, maprotiline, or amineptine selectively inhibit catecholamine reuptake. However, it remains quite difficult to define either by clinical or biological parameters which patients would preferentially benefit from one or the other type of antidepressants.

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Copyright information

© The Editors and the Contributors 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ansseau
  • R. von Frenckell
  • D. Maassen
  • J.-L. Cerfontaine
  • P. Papart
  • M. Timsit-Berthier
  • J.-J. Legros
  • G. Franck

There are no affiliations available

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