Nursing care of the patient who is institutionalised

  • Peggy Martin
Chapter

Abstract

Institutionalisation describes a syndrome of submissiveness, apathy and loss of individuality. The person loses his outside identity, and all its subsequent roles and relationships, and takes on the identity of the institution. He is no longer an individual in his own right; he becomes passive and compliant, and in hospital he conforms to the role of the ‘good’ patient.

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References and Further Reading

References

  1. Barton, R. (1976), Institutional Neurosis, 3rd edn, John Wright, Bristol.Google Scholar
  2. Jourard, S. M. (1971), The Transparent Self, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Orem, D. E. (1980), Nursing: Concepts of Practice, 2nd edn, McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Scadden, J. (1985), An ideal typical approach to the study of nurse-patient interactions in psychiatric settings, Unpublished dissertation, submitted for the degree of M.Sc. in Social Research, Department of Sociology, University of Surrey.Google Scholar

Further reading

  1. Armitage, P. (1986), The rehabilitation and nursing care of severely disabled psychiatric patients, International Journal of Nursing Studies, 23, No. 2, 112–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Barton, R. (1976), Institutional Neurosis, 3rd edn, John Wright, Bristol.Google Scholar
  3. Lloyd, R. (1981), Wanted: a change of attitude, Nursing Mirror, 153, No. 11, 32–33.Google Scholar
  4. Meisenhelder, J. B. (1985), Self-esteem: a closer look at clinical intervention, International Journal of Nursing Studies, 22, No. 2, 127–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Salmon, P. F. (1983), The long-stay psychiatric patient, Nursing Times, 79, No. 37, 39–40.Google Scholar
  6. Waters, V. (1986), The sound of silence, Nursing Times, 82, No. 23, 40–42.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Peggy Martin and the Individual Contributors 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peggy Martin

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