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Activity Patterns of Spinocerebellar Neurons during Normal Locomotion

  • Corey L. Cleland
  • J. A. Hoffer
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (WGS)

Abstract

There is compelling evidence that the cerebellum is necessary for normal locomotion. Lesions of the cerebellum, although they may not prevent initiation and execution of locomotiom, disturb coordination and balance (reviewed by Dow and Moruzzi, 1958). Yet, in spite of extensive knowledge about the anatomy, cellular properties and synaptic organization of cerebellar neurons (reviewed by Ito, 1984), the specific functions of the cerebellum during locomotion remain a mystery.

Keywords

Electrical Stimulation Instantaneous Frequency Lateral Gastrocnemius Muscle Afferents Anterior Tibial Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corey L. Cleland
  • J. A. Hoffer

There are no affiliations available

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