Opponent-Colours Theory in the Light of Physiological Findings

  • D. Jameson
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (WGS)

Abstract

The idea of opponent or antagonistic processes as the basic physiological substrate of our ability to perceive colors was originally developed by E. Hering before the discovery of what was initially called visual purple, and long before anything at all was known about cone receptors or the cone photopigments. Hering’s antagonistic mechanisms were thought by him to be neural, and to be somehow associated with opposite neurochemical processes. Moreover, although Hering’s idea was formulated as a three-variable concept, and although he published quantitative studies of metameric color-mixture and was concerned with matters such as intensity invariance of color matches and the influence of macular pigment on such data, he was not concerned with quantification of the psychophysical data base for the opponent mechanisms per se.

Keywords

Retina Assimilation Convolution Bleach Rounded 

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Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Jameson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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