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The Social Production of Technical Work

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Part of the Cambridge Studies in Sociology book series (CAMBSIS)

Abstract

This book’s initial interest in engineers stemmed from a conjunction of two concerns, each deriving from a separate tradition of intellectual discourse. On the one hand engineers have received attention as bearers of a special kind of knowledge, knowledge critical to production in high-technology industries. A knowledge expected to generate a crisis of organisation and legitimation in profit-oriented busienss, as control over the dominant force of production — now no longer capital or labour, but knowledge — fell into the hands of technical experts.

Keywords

  • Service Class
  • Technical Work
  • Fringe Benefit
  • Social Production
  • Labour Power

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-349-07469-3_8
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© 1986 Raymond Peter Whalley

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Whalley, P. (1986). The Social Production of Technical Work. In: The Social Production of Technical Work. Cambridge Studies in Sociology. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-07469-3_8

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