Workshop Discussion On Chapter 13

  • J. P. Paul
  • J. D. S. Gaylor
  • J. M. Courtney
  • T. Gilchrist
Part of the Strathclyde Bioengineering Seminars book series (KESE)

Abstract

Kennedy asked Lindsay if, in addition to the membrane followed by re-injection of blood into the sheep, consideration had been given to exposure of the membrane to saline or to blood from which the white cells or platelets had been removed. He was interested in more information on the mechanism. Lindsay replied that saline had been used but that the other approaches had not been carried out. He added that an interesting feature was the fact that while plasma gave an indentical response to whole blood, serum pushed down the response. Lysaght commented that the part of Lindsay’s presentation dealing with the hypoxaemia and neutropenia was very well supported with evidence but that the part relating to the hypersensitivity reactions was entirely speculative. He wondered how Lindsay’s hypothesis could be reconciled with the fact that fifty percent of the reactions are on the first use. The key question was whether hypersensitivity reactions have been observed with membranes that do not activate complement. When Farrell commented that such reactions can be obtained with non-complement activating devices, Lysaght remarked that, in this case, Lindsay’s hypothesis was not valid. Lindsay disagreed and stated that no-one had really looked at complement activation on prolonged exposure. He added that complement

Keywords

Cellulose Bicarbonate Neutropenia Polyacrylonitrile 

Copyright information

© Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Paul
  • J. D. S. Gaylor
  • J. M. Courtney
  • T. Gilchrist

There are no affiliations available

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