Who are the Parents?

  • Irene Fox

Abstract

In Chapter 1 the arguments which have been used to link the possession of a public school education with the notion of privilege were rehearsed. In particular, the voluminous amount of data on élites and their education1 leaves no doubt that a strong and positive correlation exists between the two phenomena. It is the precise nature and extent of the privilege which is still open to debate and this will be discussed at points throughout the book. Whilst the schools as a social institution are symbolic of the values embedded in a class divided society, an obsession with privilege per se must not be allowed to preclude a more careful and detailed examination of the background of those currently ‘enjoying’ a public school education than has hitherto been undertaken. It is only through such an examination that one can begin to move towards a clearer delineation of the pattern and boundaries of the privilege which is conventionally associated with the public schools.

Keywords

Corn Depression Income Stratification Expense 

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Who are the Parents?

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© Irene Fox 1985

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  • Irene Fox

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