How PR Differs from Advertising

  • Frank Jefkins
Part of the Macmillan Studies in Marketing Management book series

Abstract

As we have seen in the first chapter there are many clear differences between public relations and advertising. One informs and the other persuades, one seeks to create understanding and the other aims to persuade people to buy or to take some desired action. Any form of publicity is not therefore advertising, but misunderstandings about the distinction mean that the media are often afraid to declare product names in case the reference is misconstrued as advertising. This leads to the unfair situation when a product is named when the news is bad, but is not named when the news is good! Moreover, it is not enough to define advertising as publicity which has been paid for, because although no payment will have been made for the space or time given to PR information, some cost, such as manhours at least, will have been involved in its supply to the media. Public relations is not therefore free advertising.

Keywords

Cholesterol Benzole Transportation Income Marketing 

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References

  1. 1.
    David Bernstein, Creative Advertising (London: Longman, 1974) p. 155.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Frank Jefkins, Advertising Made Simple, 3rd ed. (three case studies) (London: Heinemann, 1982).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    John Kenneth Galbraith, American Capitalism (London: Pelican Books, 1963) p. 125.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Frank Jefkins, Effective Publicity Writing (Croydon: Frank Jefkins School of Public Relations, 1981).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Herbert Lloyd, Teach Yourself Public Relations, 2nd ed. (London: English Universities Press, 1970) p. 3.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Frank Jefkins 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Jefkins

There are no affiliations available

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