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Capillary column gas chromatography and its application in toxicology*

  • B. S. Thomas
  • E. Bailey

Abstract

The prediction that capillary columns will totally replace conventional packed columns in toxicological investigations by gas chromatography (GC) is already more than half fulfilled (Van Boven and Sunshine, 1979). The importance of GC as an analytical tool has been re-emphasised by the now widespread use of capillary columns, particularly in multi-component analyses and trace-level determinations of selected compounds in complex biological and environmental samples. For example, in the Italian Seveso incident such a method was necessary to identify a highly toxic chloro-dioxin compound, TCDD, in tissue of dead animals from the contaminated area (Frigerio, 1978).

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  • B. S. Thomas
  • E. Bailey

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