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Regulation of the level of methylation of a protein involved in bacterial chemotaxis

  • Roy A Black
  • Ann C Hobson
  • Julius Adler

Abstract

In 1975 our laboratory reported that a methylated membrane protein is involved in bacterial chemotaxis (Kort et al., 1975). It is now known that the extent of methylation of this protein (called MCP for methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein) is altered during the chemotactic response (reviewed in Springer et al., 1979), that the residue methylated is glutamate (Kleene et al., 1977; Van Der Werf and Koshland, 1977), that the donor is S-adenosylmethionine (Springer and Koshland, 1977), and that the methyl group is removed enzymatically to yield methanol (Toews and Adler, 1979). More recently, we have focused on regulation of the demethylation reaction and have found a novel effector of this enzymatic activity, cyclic GMP (cGMP).

Keywords

Methylation Level Swimming Behavior Chemotactic Response Bacterial Chemotaxis Sensory Adaptation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The contributors 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy A Black
    • 1
  • Ann C Hobson
    • 1
  • Julius Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Biochemistry and GeneticsCollege of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUnited States

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