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3-Substituted-4-methoxy-5-hydroxybenzaldehydes and benzoic acids as inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase

  • Ronald T. Borchardt
  • Joan A. Huber

Abstract

The extraneuronal inactivation of catecholamines and the detoxification of many xenobiotic catechols are dependent upon the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6). COMT is a soluble, magnesium-requiring enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to a catechol substrate resulting in the formation of the meta and para-O-methylated products (Borchardt, 1980).

Keywords

Benzoic Acid Sulfhydryl Group COMT Activity Benzaldehyde Derivative Catechol Substrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© The Contributors 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald T. Borchardt
    • 1
  • Joan A. Huber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of KansasLawrenceUnited Kingdom

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