Mathematical Modelling of Bilirubin Removal from Jaundiced Newborn Babies by Haemoperfusion

  • L. S. Fishler
  • S. Sideman
  • L. Mor
  • J. M. Brandes
Chapter
Part of the Strathclyde Bioengineering Seminars book series (KESE)

Abstract

One indication of an unsatisfactory liver function is the build-up of bilirubin (BIL) in the plasma. This phenomenon usually leads to jaundice, associated with hepatic failure coma and the Crigler-Najjar syndrome in adults, and with neurological damage to newborn babies, kernicterus and, sometimes, death. Due to these deleterious effects of the free, unbound BIL on the babies, it is important to reduce BIL concentration as fast as possible. Haemoperfusion (HP) — circulating the blood in an extracorporeal circuit through BIL-adsorbing ion-exchange particles in a packed-bed column — is a new clinical modality suggested to achieve this aim [Sideman et al., 1977, 1979].

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References

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Copyright information

© Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. S. Fishler
  • S. Sideman
  • L. Mor
  • J. M. Brandes

There are no affiliations available

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