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Arctic Marine Ecosystems

  • M. J. Dunbar

Abstract

In this chapter are discussed: (1) the past evolution of Arctic ecosystems; (2) the significance of that evolution for the present and the future; (3) the understanding of, and exploitation of, present ecological patterns and potentials; (4) the recognition of the marine north as an ecological unit with great influence on the rest of the world; and (5) the hazards to the system of modern industrial development.

Keywords

Arctic Ocean Arctic Char Arctic Water Arctic Ecosystem Bowhead Whale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference to Note Added in Proof

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  • M. J. Dunbar

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