Forster’s Inner Passage to India

  • Vasant A. Shahane

Abstract

E. M. Forster’s A Passage to India is his most significant artistic achievement. As a vision of the Whitmanesque ‘Passage’ to the ‘soul of India’, it becomes, indeed, a ‘Passage’ of the Forsterian soul to primal thought in the Indian setting, a kind of spiritual circumnavigation of the world, from west to east, through Alexandria to the Hill of Devi. In doing so it owes something to Whitman’s articulation of his soul’s voyage:

Keywords

Fatigue Europe Expense Egypt Alan 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Walt Whitman, ‘Passage to India’, Leaves of Grass, ed. Harold W. Blodgett and Sculley Bradley ( New York: New York University Press, 1965 ), p. 418.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    E. M. Forster, A Passage to India, ed. Oliver Stallybrass, Abinger edn. ( London: Edward Arnold, 1978 ), p. 270.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    E. M. Forster, The Hill of Devi ( London: Edward Arnold, 1953 ), p. 30.Google Scholar
  4. 9.
    G. K. Das, E. M. Forster’s India ( London: Macmillan, 1977 ), Chapter 6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 11.
    Alan Wilde, Art and Order: A Study of E. M. Forster ( New York: New York University Press, 1964 ), p. 151.Google Scholar
  6. 13.
    F. R. Leavis, The Common Pursuit, ( London: Chatto and Windus, 1952 ), p. 264.Google Scholar
  7. 14.
    James McConkey, The Novels of E. M. Forster ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1957 ).Google Scholar
  8. 15.
    P. N. Furbank and F. J. Haskell, ‘E. M. Forster’, Writers at Work, ed. Malcolm Cowley ( New York: The Viking Press, 1958 ).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Judith Scherer Herz and Robert K. Martin 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasant A. Shahane

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