Industrial Relations: A Development Dilemma

  • Ukandi G. Damachi

Abstract

With the introduction of wage labour by the colonialists in Africa, the African worker was exposed to the exigencies of the world of work. It is therefore not surprising that the early strikes recorded to have taken place in Africa were in 1874, when Nova Scotian settlers in Freetown struck against the Sierra Leone Company for higher wages. There is, however, a controversy surrounding the exact date of trade union origin in Africa.1 Nevertheless, the first substantive union was formed in Lagos in 1905 by indigenous civil servants. In spite of these early developments, union growth and function in Africa, except for European settlers, tended to be slow and unrecognised until 1916 to 1917, when in the outbreak of the First World War and the revolution in Russia, a great interest was created in the institutions of workers’ power.2

Keywords

Marketing Explosive Settling Egypt Tempo 

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Ukandi G. Damachi and Hans Dieter Seibel 1986

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  • Ukandi G. Damachi

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