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Invocation to the Muses

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Abstract

The Greeks have taught us that at the beginning of every task the poet should invoke the Muses; and, unfashionable as such appeals may be, they surely have their place in any investigation of the relation between Greece old and new. It is precisely the continuing significance of the invocation, and especially its meaning to the poet, that I wish to discuss.

Keywords

  • Conscious Mind
  • Paradise Lost
  • Religious Calling
  • Divine Inspiration
  • Epic Poet

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-349-05123-6_1
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© 1983 Tom Winnifrith and Penelope Murray

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Murray, P. (1983). Invocation to the Muses. In: Winnifrith, T., Murray, P. (eds) Greece Old and New. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-05123-6_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-349-05123-6_1

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-05125-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-349-05123-6

  • eBook Packages: Palgrave History CollectionHistory (R0)