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The Soviet Power Structure, 1945–53

  • Timothy Dunmore

Abstract

The Stalinist political system was a mass of complex bureaucratic structures and organisations with ill-defined functions and overlapping responsibilities. The main barrier to an understanding of this system lies in the fact that the formal and legal roles assigned to institutions often did not indicate their real importance. This is nowhere clearer than in the cases of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR and the All Union Congress of the Communist Party. In theory these two bodies were representative of the masses of the people and the party respectively. In practice they met very rarely — the Soviet for a few days each year and the Congress only once between 1945 and 1953 — and they were largely ceremonial occasions. Real decision-making power lay to an extent with the executive bodies of the Soviet — the Council of Ministers and the the Presidium — but above all with the party’s executive — the Politburo and Secretariat.

Keywords

Central Committee Party Member Ministerial Official Party Organisation Party Secretary 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    M. Djilas, Conversations with Stalin (London: Hart-Davis, 1962) p. 134.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    R. Medvedev, Let History Judge (London: Macmillan, 1972) p. 557.Google Scholar
  3. 15.
    See J. Hough, “The Soviet Concept of the Relationship Between the Lower Party Organs and the State Administration”, in J.L. Nogee (ed.), Man, State, and Society in the Soviet Union (London: Pall Mall Press, 1972) pp. 142–46.Google Scholar
  4. 34.
    J. Hough, The Soviet Prefects: the Local Party Organs in Industrial Decision-Making (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1968).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Timothy Dunmore 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy Dunmore
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EssexUK

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