The Quest for Self in Modern Korean Poetry

  • Peter Hacksoo Lee

Abstract

Modern Korean poetry has matured in a most turbulent setting: Japanese Occupation (1910–45), collapse of the independent movement (1919), the Second World War, the liberation (1945), the Korean War (1950–3), the revolutions (1960, 1961) . Few peoples have experienced so many political and spiritual crises in a span of fifty years. But what is important is that these crises were occasions for the emergence of a new generation with a new voice. Each time, new writers subjected the ruling literary fashions to a fresh valuation. The cultural and moral crises not only fostered the experimental movements — a rapid succession of literary movements and ideas brought some confusion — but effected the modernisation of the language and the liberalisation of techniques.1

Keywords

Burning Fatigue Dust Amid Coherence 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    Samuel C. Chew, ed. Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (New York: The Odyssey Press,1936), pp. 202–3.Google Scholar
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    Kim Yong-Jik, Han’guk hyôndaesi yôn’gu ( Studies in Modern Korean Poetry) (Seoul: Ilchisa, 1974 ), pp. 157–90Google Scholar
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    Kim Hak-Tong, Han’guk kittndae siinyôn’gu ( Studies in Modern Korean Poets), (Seoul: Ilchogak, 1974 ), pp. 47–85Google Scholar
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    U-chang Kim, ‘Sorrow and Stillness: A View of Modern Korean Poetry’, Literature East and West, xiii (June 1969), p. 154.Google Scholar
  5. 21.
    Kim Jong Gil, ‘T. S. Eliot’s Influence on Modern Korean Poetry’, Literature East and West, xiii (December 1969), pp. 359–76Google Scholar
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    Harry Levin, Refractions ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1966 ), p. 295.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Guy Amirthanayagam 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Hacksoo Lee

There are no affiliations available

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