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The First Clinics

  • Audrey Leathard

Abstract

Marie Stopes (1880–1958) shattered the great public silence on birth control by her spectacular activities. A remarkable woman of intellect, energy and intense ambition, she had become, by 1905, the youngest Doctor of Science in England; the first woman to be appointed a lecturer on the scientific staff of Manchester University; and already awarded a Ph.D. from the University of Munich (1904).1 As her palaeobotanical researches began to yield important results, she became well-known in her own professional field.

Keywords

Birth Control Clinic Attendance Birth Control Clinic Welfare Centre Child Welfare Centre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    I am indebted to Ruth Hall, author of Marie Stopes: A Biography (London: Andre Deutsch, 1977) for this information. Marie Stopes’ earlier biographers, Aylmer Maude and Keith Briant, both state the incorrect figure of L100.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Audrey Leathard 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audrey Leathard

There are no affiliations available

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