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Local Government

  • Richard Rose
  • Ian McAllister
Part of the Palgrave Historical and Political Facts book series (PHPF)

Abstract

The concept of urban centre is relative, and differs throughout the United Kingdom. England has many urban centres and conurbations, whereas the non-English parts of the United Kingdom tend to have a single conurbation—the South Wales industrial belt; the Belfast conurbation and, in Central Scotland, the major concentration from Strathclyde to the Lothians. Whereas the largest city in England is London, with a population of 7,111,000, the largest city in Scotland, Glasgow, has a population of 856,000; in Northern Ireland, Belfast, 363,000 and in Wales, Cardiff, 281,500. Northern Ireland is the area most dominated by a single city, for Belfast constitutes 23 per cent of its population, whereas London constitutes but 15 per cent of the population of England, Glasgow 17 per cent of the population of Scotland, and Cardiff 11 per cent of the Welsh population. Scotland has three cities in addition to Glasgow with a population of more than 100,000: Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Dundee; and Wales has two in addition to Cardiff: Swansea and Newport.

Keywords

Local Government District Council District Election Party Control Comparable District 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Richard Rose and Ian McAllister 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Rose
    • 1
  • Ian McAllister
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for the Study of Public PolicyUniversity of StrathclydeUK

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